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Studies in Spanish Literature

Study of the literatures of Spain centering on representative authors and texts from various literary movements, situated within their sociohistorical contexts.

Requisites: Prerequisite, SPAN 301 or 302.
Gen Ed: LA.

Instructor: Prof. Jo Lindquist

This course will explore how Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age society perceives the roles of heroes, nemeses, women from all social classes, monsters, and demons in relations to the deadly sins. Of special interest is how this society perceives the supernatural, witchcraft, demons, and monsters.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302

Instructor: Prof. Carmen Hsu

This course explores the representations of love and conflict in some of the most representative texts in Spanish literature between the twelfth and twentieth centuries. Through close readings of the most representative works written during the period, we will embark on an exciting journey to explore how and why love and conflict – understood in their broadest sense – became materials for literature. While we examine the various ways in which various authors view and express differently love and conflict, we also explore (1) how their representations engage with factors including history, religion, politics, ideology, and other cultural productions, and (2) the possible reasons for such various treatments of the themes.

The goals of the course, in addition to acquainting majors and minors with knowledge of and insight into the development of Spanish literature and culture from its genesis until the twentieth century, include strengthening reading and oral communication abilities, honing analytical skills, and developing research confidence in academic writing.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302

Instructor: Prof. Jo Lindquist

This course will explore how true love or the idea of love is manipulated by men and women across different social classes to either achieve courtly love or physical love and what are the outcomes of these actions. The texts to be covered are:

– Las jarchas – A daughter’s love and a mother’s experience
– Cantar de mio Cid – Ideal love between spouses.
– Romances fronterizos “Romance del rey Rodrigo”, “La reina Ginebra” – El conde Lucanor
– A hero’s love: Tristán e YseultBaladro del Sabio Merlín Art y Amadís de Gaula
– Courtly Love: Marqués de Santillana, Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Góngora, Lope de Vega y Quevedo
– Love for sale and the marketing of love: Celestina y Trotaconventos
– María de Zayas – La fuerza del amor
– Mature Impossible Love: Don Quijote de la Mancha
– Violence and Rape in the Name of Love: Fuenteovejuna (Lope de Vega) and El burlador de Sevilla (Tirso de Molina)

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302

Instructor: Prof. Carmen Hsu

This course explores the representations of love and conflict in some of the most representatives works in Spanish literature. While we examine the various ways in which various authors view and express differently love and conflict, we also explore (1) how their representations engage with factors including history, religion, politics, ideology, and other cultural productions, and (2) the possible reasons behind such various treatments of the themes.

Prerequisite: SPAN 301 or SPAN 302

Instructor: Prof. Jo Lindquist

Study of the literatures of Spain centering on representative authors and texts from various literary movements, situated within their sociohistorical contexts. This course will concentrate on the role of women in society as seen by men and women.  The course will explore the roles of servants, entrepreneurs, wifes, noble women muses, Christian and no Christian women, nuns (religious dedication), and female authors.

The texts to be covered are:

  • Las jarchas – A daughter’s love and a mother’s experience
  • Cantar de mio Cid – Doña Ximena and her daughters – A mother’s love and protection.
  • Romances fronterizos – El conde Lucanor –Love in the time of war.
  • Courtly Poetry: Marqués de Santillana, Juan Boscán, Garcilaso de la Vega, Góngora, Lope de Vega y Quevedo
  • The begeting of the hero: Baladro del Sabio Merlín y Amadís de Gaula
  • Witches, Prostitutes, Merchants, Entrepeneurs, Victims, and Thieves: La Celestina
  • The Big Voices of Female Autors: Santa Teresa, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz y María de Zayas (La fuerza del amor).
  • The Beloved: ¿Muse or Lover? –  Don Quijote de la Mancha – El burlador de Sevilla
  • Female “Honor”: Las siete partidas de Alfonso X y Fuenteovejuna (Lope de Vega)

Study of the literatures of Spain centering on representative authors and texts from various literary movements, situated within their sociohistorical contexts. This course will concentrate on how Medieval, Renaissance, and Golden Age Spanish society views law, love, and supernatural events across the social hierarchy.

Instructional mode: synchronous remote

This course explores the representations of love and conflict in some of the most representatives works in Spanish literature. While we will examine the various ways in which various authors view and express differently love and conflict, we will also explore (1) how their representations engage with factors including history, religion, politics, ideology, and other cultural productions, and (2) the possible reasons behind such various treatments of the themes.

Instructional mode: synchronous remote

This course offers students the opportunity to analyze literature with a focus on history, society, and literary genres using primary works from the Middle Ages to 1700.  In this course, students will learn to analyze poetry, short stories, novels, and plays.  The course’s main focus is a critical study and analysis of primary texts within a historical, artistic, political, socioeconomical, and legal context within specific topics. This thematical division will highlight how these primary texts show authority, genre, discourse, crimes and law, social order, religion, courtly love, and sexuality.  In Spring 2020, the three main topics are the concept of knight (hero/ heroine), powerful women in the lower social stratum, and how traveling influences the nature of main characters

Several socio-cultural and historical events during the 16th and 17th centuries contributed to the creation of an especially conflictive and troubling period in early modern Spanish society. As troubling and demoralizing as they might have been, these circumstances also contributed to the artistic creativity of great writers including Santa Teresa, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, among many others. Through close readings and analysis of the most representative works written between 1490s and 1690s, we will embark on an exciting journey to explore how and why conflict and oppression – understood in their broadest sense – became materials for literature. In other words, while we situate texts in their literary contexts, we also explore the ways in which the writings of early modern Spanish authors interacted, dialogued with, and responded to the cultural (political, religious, social, intellectual, etc.) tensions/struggles of their time.